Created in the 1950s by psychologist Carl Rogers, this therapy promotes a humanistic approach. The therapy explores the way you perceive yourself consciously, rather than how a therapist interprets your unconscious thoughts or ideas.

The fundamental thought behind the therapy is that people have an innate capacity and desire for personal growth and change. However, the ability to develop towards your full potential can become restricted or distorted by life experiences and in particular, those life experiences that negatively affect your sense of value and self-worth.

Following a humanistic approach, this talking therapy works to understand experiences from your perspective. Your therapist will value you, as a person, in all aspects of your humanity. This method aims to help the individual feel accepted and to better understand their feelings. The overriding goal is to reconnect them with their values and sense of worth to pave the way for moving forward and progressing on the road to recovery.

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Person-Centred Therapy works by allowing you to explore and tap into your own strengths and personal identity. It encourages you to take an active role in your recovery and to come up with your own strategies for living substance-free.

Unlike the approach of many traditional therapies, Person-Centred Therapy encourages the client to lead the process. Your therapist will listen, encourage and support you without interrupting or interfering with your process of self-discovery. In effect, you become the expert and your therapist facilitates your journey. It’s a collaborative process but you decide what course of action to take. Your therapist feeds back and clarifies your responses to enable you to get a clearer picture of what needs to change. Person-Centred Therapy can help you find a balance between who you are and who you want to be.

This type of therapy can help in several ways. Firstly, it takes the focus away from the substance you are addicted to. Drugs or alcohol misuse and its associated addicted behaviour are not the sole focus. The emphasis broadens to explore you, as a whole person and your perception of reality. It allows you to explore how you battle with addiction and why you might engage in certain behaviours.

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