Adderall is an addictive prescription Stimulant with effects similar to Meth. Because of its potency and accessibility, the risk of Adderall addiction and abuse is high.

Adderall works by increasing dopamine and norepinephrine levels in the central nervous system (CNS). Norepinephrine affects how the brain responds to events, particularly how it pays attention and the speed with which it reacts to outside stimuli. Dopamine, the body’s “feel-good” chemical, creates a rewarding effect. Although dopamine occurs naturally, drugs like Adderall produce unnaturally high levels of it. This can cause users to come back for more.

The brain of an addicted person is dependent on Adderall to stimulate alertness and productivity. Without Adderall, addicted people often feel tired and mentally foggy.

Many people have the misconception that Adderall is “safe” because it is prescribed by doctors. However, continued abuse of Adderall can lead to long-term side effects and a strong addiction.

Some people abuse Adderall because it produces feelings of confidence, euphoria, increased concentration, and a suppressed appetite. These effects make Adderall a go-to choose for anyone who wants to perform better physically and mentally.

Taking Adderall without a prescription, or in a way not directed by a doctor, is considered abuse. This includes snorting Adderall pills or taking larger doses to get a stronger effect.

Adderall can be abused for many reasons, including:

  • Weight loss
  • Studying
  • Athletic performance
  • Staying awake

Although people tend to associate Adderall abuse with students, many older people also use the drug. Most people who have received treatment for an Adderall addiction started taking it in their early twenties.